Call My Bluff

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Post by Legend on Fri 25 Mar 2011, 7:25 pm

This game is based on a long-running British game show between two teams of three celebrity contestants.

Rules
One person should state a word and give from 2 to 4 potential definitions for it. One of the chosen definitions must be correct and (although not essential) it would be good if you included possible roots of the word as well. Without using Google, the first person to correctly indentify which is the correct definition wins and gets to go next.

The game depends on the quality of the red herrings, the definitions designed to deliberately mislead the solver.

Good red herrings often include a colourful but plausible etymology, or an element of humour (for example, the erroneous definition of MINIVET as, 'An animal doctor specialising in small animals'). They may define a word that is similar to the obscure word (for example, 'The least possible' may be included as a potential definition of the word MINIUM, because it defines the similarly spelt word MINIMUM).

HAPTIC
- Any type of small lichen can be described as HAPTIC.
- HAPTIC would generally be seen in a Mobile Army Surgical Hospital (MASH). It is an antibiotic.
- The best explanation for HAPTIC, would be of or related to the ammonia family. It is a type of cleaning agent used in bathrooms.
- Simply put HAPTIC is of or relating to the sense of touch.
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Post by Guest on Tue 29 Mar 2011, 6:53 pm

Haptic........sounds too much like a botanical term, but Septic/Haptic? sounds too good to be true.......Haptic as an ammonia or do you mean Harpic!.......Haptic, a sense ?, no, can't see it, doesn't sound right.

I am going to say that Haptic is a type of lichen.

But I think you made that a bit easy, didn't you ?

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Post by Legend on Tue 29 Mar 2011, 7:25 pm

Yep that's correct Jubbahey. I did make an easy one to get the ball rolling thumbsup
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Post by Solerina on Tue 29 Mar 2011, 7:31 pm

Are you sure Jubbahey's correct Legend?

I've googled and I think it's touch Erm

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Post by theundisputedY2D2 on Tue 29 Mar 2011, 7:35 pm

I googled it too....(I know, I know!).....and Solerina's right.

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Post by Guest on Tue 29 Mar 2011, 7:56 pm

Damn it, I got a "BLUFF" card. Crying or Very sad

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Post by Legend on Tue 29 Mar 2011, 8:42 pm

Yh yh. Sorry got it mixed up. Lol. I posted it so long ago! My bad
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Post by theundisputedY2D2 on Wed 30 Mar 2011, 11:08 am

laughing

Good stuff Legend! That was (pardon the pun) legen...






wait for it...







wait for it...











dary! thumbsup

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Post by Legend on Wed 30 Mar 2011, 3:55 pm

Anyone else fancy a go?
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Post by theundisputedY2D2 on Wed 30 Mar 2011, 4:41 pm

I've got one:

ABA

- A dance where all the participants form a circle and opposites come together in the centre.

- A garment or fabric made of camel or goat hair.

- A tribute to the Swedish pop group ABBA, minus a Bjorn lookalike.

- A male Japanese pearl-diver.

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Post by Guest on Wed 06 Apr 2011, 7:34 pm

ABA - haven't a clue, will have to guess, prob wrong again !

A dance ? if they did that it would be a mess wouldn't it ? so no.

A garment from goat hair, does Federer know this ? so no.

A tribute to ABBA ? sounds reasonable, but who'd play the piano ? so no.

It must be, by logic and the basic rule of thumb -

a Jap diver.

Now I've said it, it sounds wrong but I'll stick with it.

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Post by theundisputedY2D2 on Thu 07 Apr 2011, 10:48 am

***Holds up a "BLUFF" card as the audience goes mild***

ABA is in fact, a garment or fabric made of camel or goat hair.

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Post by Legend on Thu 07 Apr 2011, 11:30 am

Round 2 - Swashbuckler

- Swashbuckler was the name given to the men who cooked for soldiers during the Roman era. To swashbuckler is to cook for a large number of people, originating from the Latin word 'buckliacci' meaning 'to serve a banquet'. Swashbucklers would often cook large pots of stew for up to one hundred soldiers at a time. However, despite this they were commonly disrespected by the soldiers, as they would not take part in the battles on the front line.

- A swashbuckler is a person who is said to rage, bring on shenanigans and consume unreasonable amounts of alcoholic beverages. For example "me and my mates swashbuckled at that bar last night, it was a good night!" The word was most commonly used during the mid-1980s, but has died out in recent  years.

- The word 'swashbuckler' was first used in the 16th century to describe a man who fights with swagger. People previously just used 'swash' to describe them, but the 'buckler' part was added later on. The original sense seems to have been 'one who makes menacing noises by striking his or his opponent's shield'. Hence the addition of 'buckler' - meaning shield from the Latin buckus.
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Post by Solerina on Thu 07 Apr 2011, 2:28 pm

Jubbahey wrote:

A garment from goat hair, does Federer know this ?

Lol Jubba.

I thought it was going to be the ABBA tribute band <blush>

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Post by Guest on Thu 07 Apr 2011, 2:28 pm

- The word 'swashbuckler' was first used in the 16th century to describe a man who fights with swagger. People previously just used 'swash' to describe them, but the 'buckler' part was added later on. The original sense seems to have been 'one who makes menacing noises by striking his or his opponent's shield'. Hence the addition of 'buckler' - meaning shield from the Latin buckus.

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Post by Legend on Thu 07 Apr 2011, 3:16 pm

Correct KB!
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Post by Guest on Thu 07 Apr 2011, 3:19 pm

I'm not good at these, someone else go.

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Post by Legend on Fri 29 Apr 2011, 8:42 am

Lentic
-- An adjective meaning: as relating to the Christian fast of Lent. It has its origins in the Old English lentic, literally meaning lenghthening of hours, but commonly used for the season of Spring.

-- An adjective which describes an item which has been borrowed from someone. So, a borrowed pencil could be describes as a lentic pencil. It is derived from the old English and Germanic word 'laent' which literally mean loan.

-- Lentic is an adjective meaning 'to inhabit still water'. For example, a carp could be described as a lentic fish. The word is derived from the Latin term 'lentus', which means 'slow moving'.
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