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Post by westisbest on Mon Aug 31, 2015 10:52 am

Anyone on here have diabetes, or know anyone who has it?

My son was diagnosed with it on thursday(wont be 2 till october), so very young.

He wasn't to well last week, then we noticed he was drinking much more water than usual, and therefore weeing more.

Took a urine sample and brought it to the doctors thursday, his sugar levels were very high, so was told he needed to go to Poole hospital for a blood test.

Thats when they told us he had type 1.

Needles to say it was a huge shock to both of us.

Least it wasn't worse, but will take time to get used to everything.
Back at the hospital tomorrow, where i think they want to attach a pump to his stomach, so we just press a button that gives him the insulin, which may be better than injecting him.

Just wondering if people have it or know someone who has it, young children perhaps and how they are coping.

Cheers.

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Post by ONETWOFOREVER on Mon Aug 31, 2015 11:09 am

Sorry to hear the news.

Just wondered how installing a stomach pump is easier then injecting. I know kids don't like needles but is the stomach punch a painless procedure?

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Post by Dolphin Ziggler on Mon Aug 31, 2015 11:13 am

Hope you and your fiance (I think I read you were getting married soon?) are not too stressed out about this Westi. From what I gather the NHS should provide a good amount of assistance for all three of you, with regular hospital checkups and a care team supporting the family. In many ways it seems to me like the younger these things are found the better it is for maintaining control. Dietary needs are not going to have to suddenly change for a child who understands them; by the time your son is more aware of what hes eating the habits of diabetes patients will be much more ingrained in him, and you two as parents.

Schools are much better these days in monitoring and contributing to the care of these illnesses too.

My own experience is pretty limited but as a kid I spent time with a lad with type 1 diabetes and he lived a normal life aside from having simple injections. It seems to me from stuff I read on diabetes a while back that hypos are a stressful part, but I suspect the initial shock of having to deal with one of these "attacks" will be jarring, and after that much easier to cope with.

Best of luck to you and your young family mate OK

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Post by westisbest on Mon Aug 31, 2015 11:30 am

ONETWOFOREVER wrote:Sorry to hear the news.

Just wondered how installing a stomach pump is easier then injecting. I know kids don't like needles but is the stomach punch a painless procedure?

Cheers onetwo

I think it maybe easier in the sense that we don't need to hold him still to inject. He knows something is coming.
Its more that than the actual injection itself, yes he cries for a few seconds, but is fine straight after.

If pushing a button than wont need to restrain him.
But not sure how uncomfortable the pump will be.

This is just what doctors have told us.

He is fine with checking his blood sugar, as this is just one second in terms of its just a Tinkywinky to the finger, than place a strip into the blood to get the reading.
We shall see.


Last edited by westisbest on Mon Aug 31, 2015 11:41 am; edited 1 time in total

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Post by westisbest on Mon Aug 31, 2015 11:40 am

Dolphin Ziggler wrote:Hope you and your fiance (I think I read you were getting married soon?) are not too stressed out about this Westi. From what I gather the NHS should provide a good amount of assistance for all three of you, with regular hospital checkups and a care team supporting the family. In many ways it seems to me like the younger these things are found the better it is for maintaining control. Dietary needs are not going to have to suddenly change for a child who understands them; by the time your son is more aware of what hes eating the habits of diabetes patients will be much more ingrained in him, and you two as parents.

Schools are much better these days in monitoring and contributing to the care of these illnesses too.

My own experience is pretty limited but as a kid I spent time with a lad with type 1 diabetes and he lived a normal life aside from having simple injections. It seems to me from stuff I read on diabetes a while back that hypos are a stressful part, but I suspect the initial shock of having to deal with one of these "attacks" will be jarring, and after that much easier to cope with.

Best of luck to you and your young family mate OK

Cheers dolph.
Got married on the 21st.

Yeah they said its better he has it now, than in a few years. He is to young to understand what is going on, so he wont know any different.

They were saying that he can still lead a normal life, in terms of things he will be able to do.
Although he wont be able to join the army.

He was hypo on friday, looked like he was going to pass out, so checked his blood sugar levels and was very low, so had to give him some insulin. These are the things we need to watch out for, his change in behaviour, a few minutes earlier he was playing in the kids room.

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Post by kingraf on Mon Aug 31, 2015 12:12 pm

Which type does he have, mate?

edit, just saw it Doh
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Post by kingraf on Mon Aug 31, 2015 12:23 pm

My old man has diabetes. Manageable enough, but the repetitie nature o the treatment does grind down a touch. Be careful for that, because you or your son when he is old enough to be responsible for his own well being need to be constantly vigil. Then just in terms of treatment in case of an emergency.

Diabetes Mellitus
Diabetes mellitus is a systemic disease affecting the pancreas, which becomes incapable of producing insulin
Insulin promotes the utilisation of glucose by the body cells
In the absence of insulin, glucose accumulates in the blood
Diabetic emergencies can result from uncontrolled blood glucose levels
Hypoglycaemia (low glucose) due to excessive insulin administration
Hyperglycaemia (high glucose) due to insufficient insulin administration
General principles of treating diabetic emergencies
It may be difficult to determine whether a comatose diabetic is hyper or hypoglycaemic

General rules of treating comatose diabetics:
Any patient in coma of unknown cause should receive glucose, unless there is a good reason to suspect stroke
Diabetics get into trouble from both hypo- and hyperglycaemia; when in doubt, assume the diabetic is hypoglycaemic and give glucose
You will not harm a hyperglycaemic victim by giving glucose, but could very seriously harm and even kill a hypoglycaemic patient by withholding glucose
When in doubt, give glucose!
Diabetic ketoacidosis
Occurs due to hyperglycaemia (too little insulin)
Progresses slowly over a period of 12 to 48 hours
The body faces starvation; the cells are not able to utilize available glucose without insulin
The boy turns to other sources of energy i.e. fat
The metabolism of fat generates acids and ketones as waste products
Ketones gives the characteristic fruity odour to the breath of victims in diabetic ketoacidosis
The victim passes large amounts of urine due to the high solute concentration of the blood, and together with vomiting, causes dehydration and even shock
Signs and symptoms
Polyuria (excessive urine output)
Polydipsia (excessive thirst)
Polyphagia (excessive eating) due to inefficient utilization of nutrients
Nausea and vomiting
Tachycardia (fast heart rate) due to dehydration
Deep rapid respirations; to compensate for acidosis by blowing off carbon dioxide
Warm, dry skin and dry mucous membranes, reflecting dehydration
Fruity odour of ketones on the breath
Sometimes fever, abdominal pain and hypotension

Management
Maintain the victim’s airway should it be compromised due to loss of consciousness
Activate the emergency medical services as soon as possible because the patient will need intravenous rehydration therapy
Do not give insulin, should await the victim’s arrival at the hospital where therapy can be closely monitored with laboratory determinants of blood glucose, ketones and acidosis.
Hypoglycaemia
Due to excessive insulin administration and/or too little food
The central nervous system i.e. the brain depends solely on glucose for energy
The brain is starved during hypoglycaemia; progresses very rapidly
Other conditions that can be the cause of hypoglycaemic coma include, alcoholics, drug overdose, cancer, liver disease, kidney disease etc.
Do not discount the possibility of hypoglycaemia in a comatose patient just because the victim is not known to be diabetic

Signs and symptoms
Weakness and light headedness
Headache
Mental confusion
Fatigue
Memory loss
Incoordination
Slurred speech
Irritable, nervous, belligerent or bizarre behaviour
Seizures or coma in severe cases
Weak rapid pulse
Cold, clammy skin
Muscle tremors
Dilated pupils

Management
If the victim is still alert and able to swallow with an intact gag reflex, give sugar by mouth (candy bar, juice with added sugar)
Sustain from giving anything by mouth if the victim is not fully conscious
Maintain the comatose victim’s airway
Activate the emergency medical services as soon as possible to start intravenous treatment with dextrose.
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Post by westisbest on Mon Aug 31, 2015 12:37 pm

I can imagine Raf.
Glad he is managing.

Will have a proper read up of your post later.

Chees.

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Post by ShahenshahG on Mon Aug 31, 2015 3:21 pm

Sorry to hear that mate. Best of luck for you and the clan.

http://www.diabetes.co.uk/diabetes-medication/forxiga-dapagliflozin.html

Raf - Check if that applies - A colleague recently switched to it has achieved weight loss as a secondary benefit and has been pretty stable in terms of highs and lows. A bit dearer than others but pretty handy.

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Post by Guest on Mon Aug 31, 2015 8:37 pm

My nephew has type 1 and was diagnosed when he was 12. 

He has had to make minor adjustments to his diet. What doesn't help him is his mum just really seeing the worst case scenario in it and thinks he will die or something and really does him no favours in helping him live with it and cope with it. I did a working stint in an ITU department and the more elderly patients admitted with diabetes related incidents tended to be because a lack of personal care and poor diet (in terms of excessive alcohol intake).

I wish you and your family well.

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Post by navyblueshorts on Wed Sep 02, 2015 1:24 am

ShahenshahG wrote:Sorry to hear that mate. Best of luck for you and the clan.

http://www.diabetes.co.uk/diabetes-medication/forxiga-dapagliflozin.html

Raf - Check if that applies - A colleague recently switched to it has achieved weight loss as a secondary benefit and has been pretty stable in terms of highs and lows. A bit dearer than others but pretty handy.
No good for Type I. The weight loss is normally a direct aim (rather than secondary) for Type II medications as the excess weight causes Type II.
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Post by ShahenshahG on Wed Sep 02, 2015 8:00 am

Yes - but this is a supplement to insulin so the secondary benefit of this particular medicine is weight loss the primary being controlling blood sugar levels by getting rid of excess glucose . Hence the stability which should then help the patient to adhere to his own diet/exercise regimes without interruption.

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Post by navyblueshorts on Wed Sep 02, 2015 12:53 pm

ShahenshahG wrote:Yes - but this is a supplement to insulin so the secondary benefit of this particular medicine is weight loss the primary being controlling blood sugar levels by getting rid of excess glucose . Hence the stability which should then help the patient to adhere to his own diet/exercise regimes without interruption.
You no listen. It's not prescribed for Type I and no GP/diabetes clinic should be using it off script. In addition, I seriously doubt it's been approved for use in 2-year olds.


Last edited by navyblueshorts on Wed Sep 02, 2015 1:10 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Post by navyblueshorts on Wed Sep 02, 2015 1:10 pm

West

Sorry to hear about your son's diagnosis. My wife's been Type I for ~15 years and, FWIW, I'm a biochemist.

I would take with a little bit of salt, kingraf's long post, above. Most of it's OK in itself but don't for a minute think that all of what's described there is likely or even correct. For example, you don't give glucose if someone is in a hypoglycaemic coma - if they're in a coma, they can't swallow and may even inhale it. Bad news.

If you're lucky, you'll be handled by a good clinic (my wife is) and don't be afraid to ask as many questions as you like. Once your son's old enough, ask about DAFNE (Dose Adjustment For Normal Eating) as a way to manage it - if not already mentioned. My wife uses this and it's very, very flexible re. insulin dosages and lifestyle. In fact, her consultant was more than sceptical to start with but after some trials has now totally changed his clinic's practice to recommend DAFNE when the patient is up to it. Requires some understanding of (and in interest in) carbohydrate content of common foods and portion sizes etc but I would imagine it's likely to be a very good fit with a child's/adolescent's typically chaotic lifestyle.

At the end of the day, it's all about keeping the blood glucose levels typically between 5mM and ~8mM, on average. If that can be done reasonably well, pretty much all the long term issues that could (not will) arise can be avoided.

It's not all bad. All the best with it.
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Post by ShahenshahG on Wed Sep 02, 2015 1:28 pm

navyblueshorts wrote:
ShahenshahG wrote:Yes - but this is a supplement to insulin so the secondary benefit of this particular medicine is weight loss the primary being controlling blood sugar levels by getting rid of excess glucose . Hence the stability which should then help the patient to adhere to his own diet/exercise regimes without interruption.
You no listen. It's not prescribed for Type I and no GP/diabetes clinic should be using it off script. In addition, I seriously doubt it's been approved for use in 2-year olds.

And you no read. I pointed it out to Kingraf who didn't specify what type of diabetes his Father has. Hence writing "Raf -check if that applies" because it helped out someone I knew and maybe it could help his uncle should he have type 2 diabetes.

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Post by westisbest on Wed Sep 02, 2015 4:23 pm

navyblueshorts wrote:West

Sorry to hear about your son's diagnosis. My wife's been Type I for ~15 years and, FWIW, I'm a biochemist.

I would take with a little bit of salt, kingraf's long post, above. Most of it's OK in itself but don't for a minute think that all of what's described there is likely or even correct. For example, you don't give glucose if someone is in a hypoglycaemic coma - if they're in a coma, they can't swallow and may even inhale it. Bad news.

If you're lucky, you'll be handled by a good clinic (my wife is) and don't be afraid to ask as many questions as you like. Once your son's old enough, ask about DAFNE (Dose Adjustment For Normal Eating) as a way to manage it - if not already mentioned. My wife uses this and it's very, very flexible re. insulin dosages and lifestyle. In fact, her consultant was more than sceptical to start with but after some trials has now totally changed his clinic's practice to recommend DAFNE when the patient is up to it. Requires some understanding of (and in interest in) carbohydrate content of common foods and portion sizes etc but I would imagine it's likely to be a very good fit with a child's/adolescent's typically chaotic lifestyle.

At the end of the day, it's all about keeping the blood glucose levels typically between 5mM and ~8mM, on average. If that can be done reasonably well, pretty much all the long term issues that could (not will) arise can be avoided.

It's not all bad. All the best with it.

Cheers navy.

Yeah we certainly had a few questions to ask yesterday.
Have a good team we can rely on.

We are going on honeymoon on the 14th, then when we get back, he is going to go on the pump.

At first I was worried about, he cant do this, cant do that, but cant look at the negative side of it.

Gotta keep positive.

Cheers again.

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Post by navyblueshorts on Wed Sep 02, 2015 7:04 pm

ShahenshahG wrote:
navyblueshorts wrote:
ShahenshahG wrote:Yes - but this is a supplement to insulin so the secondary benefit of this particular medicine is weight loss the primary being controlling blood sugar levels by getting rid of excess glucose . Hence the stability which should then help the patient to adhere to his own diet/exercise regimes without interruption.
You no listen. It's not prescribed for Type I and no GP/diabetes clinic should be using it off script. In addition, I seriously doubt it's been approved for use in 2-year olds.

And you no read. I pointed it out to Kingraf who didn't specify what type of diabetes his Father has. Hence writing "Raf -check if that applies" because it helped out someone I knew and maybe it could help his uncle should he have type 2 diabetes.
Huh? This article is about west's son's circumstances, not raf's father's! I stupidly assumed you were referring to the situation of west's son. Silly me. Won't let it happen again.
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