How can cricket be saved?

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How can cricket be saved?

Post by It Must Be Love on Sun 18 Feb 2018, 7:58 pm

-best form of the sport 
-results too one sided in favour of home team 
-requires patience, complex for beginners to understand
-crowds dwindling 

-2nd best form 
-World Cup is pinnacle of sport, bi-series results not really remembered 
-Completely flat tracks all the time, no contest between bat and ball 
-High scores becoming predictable rather than memorable 

-Most one dimensional form of cricket 
-Flat tracks like ODI
-Best crowds, easy to attract new generation audience who like immediate reward (and that's another 6!)
-Power of players and bats mean mistimed shots/sliced shots going for six (applies to other forms of cricket, but in 2020 these shots are more likely to be decisive). To be fair, reform has started regarding limiting bat width 
-Focus on 2020 may be hindering batsman technique and potential in hostile away conditions (maybe some select indian batsman should try county cricket rather than IPL ahead of away england series?). 
-Batsman used to smashing it on road tracks for limited overs, bunny in headlight mentality in tests when ball does something they're not used to (england batsmen dealing with spin/bounce, indian with swing etc.)

Someone, solve all these problems, then send it to ICC. Thank you

It Must Be Love

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Re: How can cricket be saved?

Post by dummy_half on Mon 19 Feb 2018, 10:26 am


I think you are being a little too negative there, although certainly there are some points you raise that merit discussion:

Test cricket
'Best form' is subjective, and definitely comes from the purist end of the spectrum, and surely the argument that it requires patience and is complex goes against it being 'best'.

'Home team advantage' is something of an issue, but perhaps says as much about the inability of players to adapt to differing conditions. Boycott raised the point on TMS during the Ashes that in the 60s and 70s England would probably play 2 warm up matches at the WACA prior to the Test, and so would have some chance to adapt their game to the unique conditions there, whereas now Test tours are much more compacted and warm up games are scarce and of lower standard.

Dwindling crowds true in some places, not so in England or Aus. It would help of course if Pakistan could play at home and also if they could play India on a fairly regular basis, but obviously there are reasons far removed from cricket that make this impractical. Moves to day/night tests at least show a willingness to attempt to address these issues.

50 over ODIs I think you are being unduly harsh about - it is true that matches tend to be better if on somewhat more sporting pitches, where 280-320 is a good score, but there is no harm in having some 'roads'. I actually think that it is a form of the game that is probably better now than it has ever been.

I think your comment on T20 technique is unfair (as noted above, Test tour schedules are an issue), although your comment re bat power is reasonable - mishit straight drives should not be flying for 6 over extra cover...
I'm not a huge fan of T20, as luck seems to play a larger part in determining the result than in ODI or Tests - batsmen obviously have to play much riskier shots to keep the run rate up, but it seems as much a matter of luck as skill as to whether these go within reach of a catcher or otherwise.


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Re: How can cricket be saved?

Post by CaledonianCraig on Mon 19 Feb 2018, 11:14 am

My input here may be slight but for me it is all about where the money is. T20 is where the money is with the big leagues in Australia and India seeing players bought for big money and playing to full houses as it brings in the crowds due to it being able to be played at a time of day when more people can attend.

Personally, for me, Test Cricket is the pinnacle of the sport. The longer drawn out format allows for a more strategic game, more tension and (for me) requires better mental aptitude and better technique to succeed. I cannot see what can be done to reverse things sadly. Aside from perhaps playing more day-night tests to allow more families and more people in general the chance to attend more of the play.

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Re: How can cricket be saved?

Post by jimbohammers on Wed 21 Feb 2018, 10:15 am

IMO there won't be Test Cricket in 10-15 years time


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Re: How can cricket be saved?

Post by alfie on Wed 21 Feb 2018, 11:35 pm

Hope you're wrong there , jimbo.

There have actually been suggestions in the past that Test Cricket is on the way out ; and so far they've proved inaccurate. It is certainly true that attendances are not what they used to be in most Test playing countries ; but they remain strong in England and Australia - and frankly I do not expect that to change in a hurry.
Think there is still widespread interest in Test cricket even outside the Ashes rivalry ; just not always reflected in numbers through the gate. TV stations still pay to show the matches ; although this may move more and more into pay television and streaming services - something that is happening also in other sports.

Day-Night matches may help in some places ; I think reducing entrance pricing would also assist - and ultimately might even result in improved taking through increased numbers ? Though would surely involve cross- subsidies at first.

Actually agree with Bayliss that t20 is better left to club/franchise teams ; let us have an International Cup now and then but spare the players these meaningless t20 "series".


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